cprlaw08

josi kim - new meridian youtube channel ? (f)

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I'm actually Indian and in India people use Chhinkni all the time to sort stress issues. When the posts about it here first surfaced I couldn't believe it because some doctors over there prescribe it all the time, sometimes even for daily use. So I'm not actually sure this is a scam, it's hard to tell because I thought this sort of treatment was only used in India but it could just be a bit if a left field treatment with video diaries for the patients to look back on. Chakra gates are pretty big over in India and it could just be spin off from that that's come over to the US. No way to be sure though, unless this Dr Bryce tells us otherwise haha

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On 4/15/2017 at 0:08 AM, brokensneeze said:

On one hand, these videos aren't that different from the other "sneezing challenge" videos that people encourage women to upload to Youtube. It's unlikely they are intentionally creating fetish content. On the other hand, I sure hope that the "patients" in these videos realize that the "therapists" are not following professional rules of conduct and shouldn't be seen as real mental health professionals.

What scares me is that the woman who shared her personal account in the link upthread didn't seem to question the lack of informed consent, poorly controlled experimental conditions, refusal to provide contact information or university affiliation, etc., despite apparently being a mental health professional herself. I feel like it should have been obvious to anyone who's ever taken a research methods course that this is not a legitimate study. I'd think the dude starting to talk about her belly button sexually might be a clue-in, but I feel like women are socialized to laugh off those comments as being harmless. It really pisses me off that this guy was able to manipulate so many people... and by having them snort chemicals while filming themselves with their bodies exposed? I felt like crying when I read about how stressed out the woman's mom was getting when she tried filming her... stressing herself out for no reason. Someone on the other blog mentioned that they have a lawyer looking into the situation, but that was back in February and clearly this guy is still "practicing." I'm not sure what can be done, but I hope something is, and soon.

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15 hours ago, Edgar said:

I'm actually Indian and in India people use Chhinkni all the time to sort stress issues. When the posts about it here first surfaced I couldn't believe it because some doctors over there prescribe it all the time, sometimes even for daily use. So I'm not actually sure this is a scam, it's hard to tell because I thought this sort of treatment was only used in India but it could just be a bit if a left field treatment with video diaries for the patients to look back on. Chakra gates are pretty big over in India and it could just be spin off from that that's come over to the US. No way to be sure though, unless this Dr Bryce tells us otherwise haha

I think we can be pretty sure its a scam though because 1) these people clearly believe they are in some kind of research study, which they aren't and 2) the videos are getting uploaded to YouTube, as someone else mentioned. If it was a legitimate treatment, then why would they be uploading them to YouTube? That would almost certainly violate any patient confidentiality agreement here in the States. I'm assuming the ones in India don't get uploaded for public consumption, right? 

Not trying to ambush or discredit you; just presenting my argument for why I think what he's doing is not right... 

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13 hours ago, AnonyMouse said:

What scares me is that the woman who shared her personal account in the link upthread didn't seem to question the lack of informed consent, poorly controlled experimental conditions, refusal to provide contact information or university affiliation, etc., despite apparently being a mental health professional herself. I feel like it should have been obvious to anyone who's ever taken a research methods course that this is not a legitimate study.

I question that too. I suspect it may have to do with the fact that this guy seems to target music therapists (he said so much in the call discussed on that blog). I honestly didn't know music therapy was a "thing" until I heard at a high school reunion that a guy from my year had been working as a music therapist for a kid with autism. And even he hadn't heard of it either until someone heard he was into music and offered him that job.

Don't get me wrong--he seems like a really nice guy and it's great that he can do something he loves (making music) and maybe help a child by doing it. But, music therapy is definitely a newly emerging and "pseudoscientific" field. Not in the sense of astrology or much less "chemtrails" or other wacky stuff like that, but in the sense that it's a field built around doing what feels right and not around any kind of theoretical foundation, and that doesn't get much attention from the more academic sides of psychology. I could just imagine that many music therapists feel really satisfied and important when someone who seems to be doing research shows an interest in them, so all someone has to do is throw around some "scientific-sounding" words like "cortisol" and will get all the attention they want. Meanwhile, an actual scientist who wants to attribute a phenomenon to cortisol has to submit a ten-page proposal explaining how to control for all other variables before a study will get off the ground.

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I'd think the dude starting to talk about her belly button sexually might be a clue-in, but I feel like women are socialized to laugh off those comments as being harmless. It really pisses me off that this guy was able to manipulate so many people...

Here I have to disagree. I believe that if another woman were to comment on her navel in the same sort of way, she would get a "pass", even more than this guy did. This is an area where I feel women have significant privilege, showing interest in others' bodies. Think about how women rub each other's pregnant bellies, ask each other about intimate matters, etc. If you think about all gender combinations of people making comments about the intimate aspects of others' bodies (men or women commenting on men or women), no matter the gender of the "commentee", it is better received if the commenter is female than if he is male. In the case of a woman's body being commented on, a male speaker is seen as being sexual while a female speaker isn't, therefore the woman is seen as more innocuous. In the case of a man's body being commented on, he will see both genders of speaker as sexual, but will generally greatly admire such attention from women (unless the woman is VERY unattractive and/or repulsive in personality), yet the male will be seen as "gay" and threatening for cultural reasons.

So, while women may learn to see comments about their body from men as commonplace and usual, it is still seen as more "odd" than if another women were to make the same kind of comments.

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It really pisses me off that this guy was able to manipulate so many people... and by having them snort chemicals while filming themselves with their bodies exposed? I felt like crying when I read about how stressed out the woman's mom was getting when she tried filming her... stressing herself out for no reason. Someone on the other blog mentioned that they have a lawyer looking into the situation, but that was back in February and clearly this guy is still "practicing." I'm not sure what can be done, but I hope something is, and soon.

I would think that someone offering monetary compensation could be accused of fraud if he/she doesn't pay when the person to whom it's offered performs the requested service. Of course, the problem is that the guy will probably claim she didn't fulfill her side of the agreement by not uploading the videos on time. These kind of things are likely the reason why there exist contracts in all service industries. She really should have asked for one here.

For what it's worth, there are similar scams in almost all service industries where either the person doing the hiring or the person being hired are independent individuals. When I used to do tutoring and advertised my availability on Craigslist, there would sometimes be people who would ask the fee for x number of sessions, then would claim that they couldn't actually bring money to the sessions and would request to submit payment by some weird method, to where it seemed it must be a scam. Another scenario is with people who hire others to do voice recordings--I remember that a very similar sneeze-related scam was going on in that business that was reported on several blogs.

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Jeez. I can't believe how many videos this person has uploaded o__O

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