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Dusty15

Victorian-Era Hayfever Obs (so many!)-NOW WITH MORE!

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Dusty15

No, I totally agree. Why do you think bodice-ripper romances are so popular? :-P

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MyOwnPrivateSFC

And am I alone in feeling that the somewhat antiquated nature of the descriptions and people involved, actually makes reading the descriptions even hotter...blushing.gif

No. No, you're not. twisted.gif

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Watercolor Daydreams

Oh...

Oh my...

This topic is just...it's too beautiful for words... I...

I need a moment...

:boom:

ASKLFSKFJEWKOTIGNK34 5GMRVB THIS IS TOO PERFECT FOR WORDS!!!!

:D :D :D :D :D

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Dusty15

Well....the fetish brain got the best of me and I went searching for more delicious oldy-timey hayfever descriptions from medical publications.

Here's some more gems I've found from a publication called "Hay Fever; Its Causes, Treatment, and Effective Prevention: Experimental Researches" by Charles Harrison Blackley, published in 1880. In it, the author is describing a series of experiments trying to figure out which pollens cause reactions in people. He performed these both on patients as well as on himself.

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In another experiment tried with the pollen of the Alopecurus pratensis the lining membrane of one nostril was charged with the pollen by this being rubbed on with the point of the finger as far as this would reach. About one fiftieth of a grain was applied... In a few minutes a violent attack of sneezing came on; there was also a profuse discharge of serum, which continued for some hours, gradually diminishing towards the latter part of the time. In two hours after the experiment had commenced the mucous membrane had become so swollen that no air could be drawn through the nostril in any attempt at inspiration. 

 

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In preparing the pollen of one of the Amentaeceæ for the microscope a considerable quantity was accidentally inhaled before I was aware that it had been thrown off from the catkins so abundantly. A violent attack of sneezing came on in a few minutes, but this was not by any means so violent nor yet so persistent as I should have expected from the quantity of pollen which seemed to have been discharged....After the sneezing and coryza had continued for a couple of hours the breathing became very difficult as if from constriction of the trachea or bronchial tubes, giving me just a slight experience of the misery those have to endure who suffer severely from the asthmatic form of hay-fever.  

His observations on changes in congestion levels at night and how nose congestion affects nighttime sneezing:

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During the hay season most patients not only have paroxysms of sneezing in the day, but frequently also during the night, and especially when the disorder is just arriving at its highest point of intensity. I have myself has such attacks often, and knowing that pollen was seldom present in the air of a bedroom in quantity sufficient to bring them on, I was not able to account for them. After some time, however, I noticed these attacks came on only when the nasal passages had been more or less  occluded for a time, and that so long as there was no change in the condition of the two when they were swollen, the sneezing in the night did not occur by any means as often as it did when one of the nares suddenly became permeable to air.

On trying the experiment, I found that the paroxysm of sneezing could be brought on by changing from side to side whilst in the recumbent posture, as to give time for the fluid in the submucous tissue to gravitate and close the lower passage while the upper one became patent... In this way some of the violent attacks of sneezing which occur in the night may be accounted for. 

On exercising with allergies:

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If active exercise is taken when the disorder has become fully established the irritation in the hard palate, the nostrils, and the faces will become very marked. The fits of sneezing will also become more violent and prolonged. When we remember the quantity of air inhaled in violent exercise is three to four times the quantity we take in a state of rest, it is easy to see that rest and exercise must make a wide difference in the severity of the symptoms. 

Trouble at home...

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A bunch of grasses (I think it was the Poa nemoralis) had been gather by one of my children and placed in a vase in one of the rooms at home which I seldom entered. I happened, however, to notice the vase in going into the room a few days after the grass had been placed there, and on disturbing it to examine it, a small cloud of pollen was detached and came in close proximity to my face. I commenced sneezing violently in the course of two or three minutes, and had what i considered a rather smart, though short, attack of my usual early summer disorder.


A patient referred to as Patient 11:

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I have been annually a sufferer for nineteen years. I have for some time been sure that in my case the exciting cause if pollen, and my children know quite well in what stage of growth grass or flowers will make me sneeze and must not be brought into the house...

In my case I feel persuaded that when once the complaint is established an attack of sneezing may be produced very easily without the presence of pollen; a dusty road, railway carriages which only travel a few miles and never go into other districts, turning over calicoes, being in workrooms when being swept, the very slightest use of the pepper-castor, and various other things will produce an attack, not only when I have the disease fully developed, but also when coming on. Light has also an effect at these times. Being a botanist, I have not infrequently had attacks when looking over specimens of dried plants. I have also noticed that certain grasses apparently affect me more than others.

 

And from another book titled "Hay Fever and Paroxysmal Sneezing: Their Etiology and Treatment" by Sir Morell Mackenzie, published in 1889.

An excerpt about an allergic preacher....

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I remember once in mid-winter, calling on a sick parishioner, being seized with a violent paroxysm on the entrance into the room of the finance of the patient. My condition was such as to lead to the inquiry of how long I had had so sever a cold. My reply was 'not five minutes; but I should think, did I not see to the contrary, that I was in a room full of roses.'

The young gentleman disappeared and returned instantly with a huge bouquet of roses which, he said, finding that there was someone not of the family in the chamber, he had left in the adjoining room. 

Both in and out of the rose season, I repeatedly had roses removed from churches where I preached, and I always detected their presence before I saw them.

 

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iheartsneezn

Just when you thought this thread couldn't get any better! I don't know what it is about these old observations that just do it for me. I think maybe it's knowing that they didn't have as many treatments for it as we now have today. I Imagine if someone got caught in the throws of a "paroxysm" back then, there was no easy cabinet remedy for them to pop like benadryl or nasonex to alleviate their symptoms. They just had to sneeze, snot and snort their way through the day and bear it. In that respect it seems like it could've been an interesting time to be alive for people like us. I especially like the bit where he applies the pollen to a subjects nasal membranes and records the reaction (how many of us have dreamed of doing that).

Now if we only had some real deal fetishist memoirs from that time...

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Melody

i can't even speak, this is so wonderful... for some reason the thought of allergies during the Victorian era pushes all my buttons... just yes :wubsmiley:

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Cashew

OHHHH my gosh. There's something kind of ridiculously hot about the idea of an old-timey scientist affected by hayfever and performing experiments to see what makes it worse :))) This entire thread is gold.

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Dusty15

And....some more :)

"My nose is exquisitely sensitive, and subject to incessant and copious defluctions. The slightest draft of air produces sneezing of the most enterprising character. To sneeze in tens and twenties, with repeats ad libitum, is part of my daily duty. The odor of flowers, smoke, and cinders in cars, dust, perfume, or anything ordinarily without disagreeable effects, now produce sneezing and a copious secretion of a thin watery mucus. Your handkerchief suddenly becomes the most import object in life."

"The flow from the nostrils is so profuse that three dozen handkerchiefs are used daily. There is fever, a hot dry skin, dry mouth, eyes red and watering, which continues 'til frost. She is obliged to frequently sit up at night with obstructed nostrils and asthma"

"August 20th I began to sneeze and have the watery discharge from the head. By the close of the season it often saturates six or eight handkerchiefs per diem. The water has no colour; a handkerchief may be 'sopping wet' and yet look clean. Sometimes when I stoop over with my head towards the floor, the discharge will run out of my nose like water from a pitcher almost"

"She has had so much of the catarrhal inflammation that the mucous membrane of the nostrils is permanently thickened, obstructing them to such an extent as to oblige her to breathe through the mouth."

"Eating becomes a matter of skill. You cannot eat with your mouth at the same time you are breathing through it. Two trains meeting on a single track, one or the other must switch off. Thus, you chew and hold your breath; and then you switch to one side of your cud, and breathe a while. Thus you shut off, alternately, bread and breath. This stage lasts about two weeks."

 

"It begins with sneezing, itching of the eyes, and running at the nose. In a few days I have the symptoms of a fever, a high pulse, hot palms, and sense of pressure upon the lungs. For a month I am unfit for business. I am a lawyer, and have on several occasions had to give over the trial of a vase after it was opened."

 

 

 

 

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Luisa39

My goodness!  I'm so glad I live in the era of Flonase and Claritin D!  The people described here sound really miserable, like their whole lives were just sneezing!  I mean, who wants to live like that?  (And I'd get tired of saying "God bless you" over and over again, lol!)  

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